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#Business

Twitter expands advertising network; inks deals with Yahoo Japan, Flipboard

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Twitter has expanded its advertising network by signing deals with Yahoo Japan and Flipboard wherein it plans to sell ads that run outside its own platform by syndicating its “promoted tweets” allowing advertisers reach people who are not on Twitter.

Twitter will be leveraging the embedded tweets feature which is already available on both Yahoo and Flipboard allowing advertisers to deliver promoted messages directly to users of those services.

“These new partnerships open a significant opportunity to extend the reach of their message to a larger audience,” Twitter’s Ameet Ranadive said in a blog post. “Syndicated ads will be seen by users within Twitter content sections on third-party properties, as well as within third-party content areas.”

According to Twitter, the latest move will enable its advertisers to run simultaneous campaigns on and off Twitter. The micro-blogging giant revealed that thousands of apps and sites already utilise its products such as Fabric and Twitter for Websites to syndicate tweets and provide a rich experience to its users.

Twitter intends to utilise this platform and combine it with “flexibility and control of a promoted tweet” giving marketers “almost infinite capacity to create large-scale, rich and well-targeted advertising campaigns across a variety of platforms.”

Twitter revealed that its limited private testing with Flipboard has shown promising results.

Twitter, which is currently behind other social networking services like Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Instagram, announced in October last year that it has a monthly active user base of 284 million.

Ever since its initial public offering, Twitter has been under a lot of pressure to show both revenue and user base increase. With user base building up over the last two years, revenue is the primary concern for microblogging services. Twitter is hoping that its latest advertising deals will help it to boost its revenue figures.